stripper pole on laminate floor

People often ask about what types of flooring are safe to install a dancing pole on. Is it safe to install on carpet?…. Hard Wood? Laminate? Linoleum? Tile? And on and on. Buying a pole dancing pole for your home is an investment in your health and the last thing you want to do is invest in an activity that you thought was going to be fun but ends up damaging the floor.

Damage to the floor is a risk you take when installing a dance pole in your home, however, if you buy a good quality dancing pole and the pole is installed correctly, damage to the floor is a rare occurrence.

Good quality dancing poles have a thick gripping rubber on the bottom of the base that protects the floor. The only real damage to the floor you may need to worry about is the downward pressure the pole will put on the floor.

Stripper poles that are made of poor quality materials are not only UNSAFE to dance on, but they DON’T have the good quality rubber on the base and therefore the pole may slip out of place while it is being used causing scratches to the surface of the floor.

Here are some tips to help you understand what flooring types are best for good portable professional grade dancing pole with quality rubber on the base (if you are not sure if your pole has a good base, please read our pole dancing pole reviews):

  • Tile Floor: Tiles always have the chance of cracking from the downward pressure of the pole. One of the main reasons this can happen is because the mortar bed underneath the tile was not thick enough, or supportive enough for the tile.  An uneven or thin mortar bed can leave large air pockets underneath the tile.  If pressure is placed on the tile when there is an air pocket in the mortar bed underneath it, then it may crack.  The quality of the tile also makes a difference. Porcelain tile is easier to break than solid granite and other rock types.  There is always a risk of damage to the tile floor involved, however, a pole can be installed on a tile floor safely and danced on safely as long as it is installed correctly.  If you don’t know anything about your tile floor, ask a flooring specialist, carpenter or your landlord about your floor.
  • Laminate Flooring: This is one of the best flooring types to install a dancing pole on and my personal favorite. These floors are smooth on the surface, durable,stripper pole on laminate floor and strong. Laminate flooring typically has a foam underlay and depending on the quality of that underlay, the floor can have a little bit of “give” to it. This is a nice quality for dancing.  When installed correctly, there should be no visible sign that the pole was ever installed on the floor.
  • Hard Wood Flooring: This is sturdier than a laminate flooring type because the tongue and groove that hold the floor together is uareally nailed, glued, and just thicker/sturdier all around. This is a very good quality material for a pole installation. The smoother the surface of the wood, the better. When installed correctly, there should be no visible sign that the pole was ever installed on the floor.
  • Linoleum: This is usually glued down on a very sturdy surface like wood or concrete. When installed correctly, there will be should be no visible sign that the pole was ever installed on the floor.
  • Carpet: There are different types of carpet. Some have long fibers like “shag” carpet, some have short fibers like commercial grade carpet or Berber, and other carpets are in between, like a Plush type carpet. You can install a dancing pole on most any carpet type safely; stripper pole on carpethowever, depending on the height of the fiber, the pole may leave an indention similar to the way your couch legs would leave an indention in the carpet after sitting for a while. The longer you leave the pole up, the more chances this indention left behind will stick. In addition, if the padding underneath the carpet is thick, this will increase the chances of an indention being left behind. If you are installing on a very short-fibered commercial grade carpet, then the chances of an indention left behind are very minimal if at all. The other downslope of a dance pole being installed on carpet is the rug burn. You must be very conscious while you are dancing so you don’t rub your knees or other skin surfaces across the floor too quickly.

Setting up a space at home for your dance pole is also important for safety. You want plenty of space so you don’t kick anything when you swing on the pole. Also, if you house has different flooring types where you could choose different locations, choose a smoother flooring type to dance on so it will be easier for your feet to rotate.

Choosing a location for home pole dancing poles with a sturdy ceiling structure is also key to a correct installation. You must install it in a safe location underneath a ceiling joist, beam, or other solid and supportive structure.

You may also watch the dancing pole installation video to further understand the risks of installing a portable pole dancing pole in your home.

Also, each dance pole comes with different manufacture instructions for installation. It is important that you install according to the manufacture instructions. Watching and reading different home pole dancing pole reviews will also help you decide on a good pole for your home. Not all poles can be installed on the same flooring type.

    26 replies to "Safe Flooring Types For A Home Dancing Pole"

    • victoria

      Hi! I am looking to get a pole, but it will have to be installed outside where the floor is concrete and the ceiling wood. I sense that a concrete floor isn’t ideal… is it doable for dancing?

      • Danna

        Yes, a concrete floor is just fine for installing a pole. My very first dance pole was installed in a garage on a concrete floor and it was safe. Just be careful dancing because rubbing your skin against concrete can hurt 🙂

        • Macy

          But how do you go about doing that? I need to do the same.

    • Breanna

      Hello!

      Thank you for putting together all of this information for us 🙂

      Quick Question, is it safe to install a pole in a second floor apartment. I have hardwood floors but for some reason I have this fear of the tension from the pole causing the floor to collapse into the apartment below me or something. Is this even possible? Lol.

      Thank you!

      • Danna

        Hi Breanna, yes it is just fine to install one on the second floor of an apartment 🙂 Floors in apartments, regardless if it’s a higher level apartment, are built to handle heavy loads. They have to sustain the weight of people, furniture, appliances, etc. Many of these poles have been installed in upper level apartments with success, just be sure to install it under a ceiling joist as instructed in the installation videos 🙂

    • Sherry Hayes

      I am thinking about the portable light pole for my garage building. It has concrete floors. Are the portables as study as the ceiling mounted poles. I am doing this for fitness and excersice. I am 46, and have a 9 & 25 yr old daughters. I also have a 5 yr. Old granddaughter. Menapause has reigned terror down on my body. I want to do this to get my groove back and it looks fun… If this works I could potententially sell several for you. Are there any current deals or free shipping. Just not coming off that kind of money and can’t. It’s very pricey. Any recommendations. Also what are the weight restrictions?

      • Danna

        Hi Sherry, all the poles in the polefitnessdancingshop can be installed on concrete floors just fine. The weight limitations vary from pole to pole and there is free shipping offered on the Pro Quality Dance Pole. That dance pole is our most popular seller and the most affordable option. I am excited for your to get started – it’s a lot of fun and many women your age have used pole fitness to get their groove back 🙂 You can do it!

        • Natalia

          Hey!

          I saw that you recommended the Pro Quality Dance Pole, does it have a good rubber base/dome?? I am wondering since it’s in the “affordable” choice option how good it is compared to the others like the X pole. I just recently moved to a town where pole dancing is just a “stripper thing” and I’m missing my classes like crazy, and being so far away I think my best choice is getting a pole.

          Thanks in advance! (and also thanks for all the information you shared!!)

          • Danna

            Hi Natalia, Im sorry you are missing classes! Hopefully if you dance for yourself in your home that will help a bit, I know it helps me a lot.

            The Pro Quality pole does have the good rubber on the base and dome and the dome is the same size as the X Pole. The XPole base is smaller than the Pro Quality Pole.
            The main difference between the two is the way they are made. X Pole is easier to install, a bit more heavier, and of course has the X Joint technology unique to that brand. With the X Pole carrying case – it’s also a bit easier to transport as well – those are the main things you are paying extra for when you spring for the XPole. Hope that helps 🙂

    • Tinett Overgård

      Hi.

      Can you install an x pole xpert on tiles?

      It says in the end, that not All poles can be installed on All types of flooring.

      So I wonder if there are Any poles more suitable for installation on tiles?

      • Danna

        The X Pole X Pert and the Pro Quality dance pole can be installed on tiles. They both have soft rubber on the base that grip the floor. Just know that tiles can crack and these pole put a lot of pressure between the roof and floor. Its safe to install them on tile, but if the tile was not installed correctly on a solid mortar bed, then the pole could crack the tile if there is too much pressure. Ceramic tiles are easier to break than granite tiles as well. All these things should be considered……. I recommend contacting a qualified flooring expert if you are worried about it so they can examine your floor 🙂

    • Ashley

      I want to get a pole really bad just started going to pole fitness. I love it my question is I have a carport, and I was wondering if the pole will do any damage to it? (Concrete floor, and the carport is wood)

      • Danna

        Hi Ashley,

        As long as the carport has sturdy joists just like a house that you can install the pole beneath then no it won’t damage the wood carport or concrete floor when installed correctly : )

        Im assuming you are thinking about using a portable removable pole like the Pro Quality Pole or XPert X pole ; they will leave no visible marks that they was ever there : )

    • Angela Gentile

      Hey, I’m defiantly getting a pole but I do have carpet in an apartment I was wandering which poles would be best carpet wise for safety reasons…which poles on the site would you recommend for carpet floors I really plan on using this alot. Thank you so much for taking the time to read this. Would the rubber be enough to keep the pole stable?

      • Danna

        Hi Angela!
        Yes it’s totally safe to install a dance pole on carpet. The most common dance poles in our shop that get installed on carpet are the Pro Quality Dance Pole and the X Pole XPert model. Hope that helps : )

    • Amanda

      I’m wanting to start pole for fitness. I feel like teaching myself at home is going to be the most convenient/affordable way for me. Unfortunately, where I currently live I can’t leave the pole up all day. Is it going to be a problem to constantly take it down and put it back up?

      • Danna

        It’s not a problem to take it up and down everyday and is pretty easily once you get the hang of the way your pole installs. I used to take 7 of my Pro Quality Dance Poles up and down everyday in my pole studio when I was teaching classes with them because I had to make room form my other fitness instructors to teach their classes. It’s much easier if you don’t need to un-screw the individual pole parts through. If you can take it down and store it everyday in a spot where are the pieces can stay connected together then that’s best. If you have to unscrew the individual pole pieces to store it everyday, you are going to HATE it and I wouldn’t do it.

        If you really need a pole that super easy to take down everyday that breaks down easily into smaller pieces, the Lupit Classic dance pole is by far the easiest to break down and store. The XPert X Pole is the second best because the X Joints are easier to undo as opposed to unscrewing pole parts, HOWEVER, the X Joints can stick inside the main pole parts over time and turn the hex key can be really tight. The Classic Lupit just slides apart and it’s a breeze.

        I hope that helps doll!

        Danna

    • Lilac

      Is it safe to set up a pole with no rubber on the bottom, but rubber on the top—on carpet?

    • Sophie

      Hi, I’ve been looking into buying a pole for home but the only space I have is on the second floor of my house in the spare room. Obviously the second floor support the weight of furniture but will it be strong enough to support a pole or will I need to find a joist in the floor to support it on, if that makes sense as I imagine the second floor of a houses floors will be like a ceiling, hope that makes sense

      • Danna

        Yes, a second floor in a home or apartment is just fine for a dance pole : ) There are many people (myself included) who install dance poles on second or third floors all the time : )

    • Keleigh Levine

      Hi! This is a super helpful article. I also saw an article teaching how to know about a good quality pole, even if it’s affordable. You were stating that it can be installed on a slanted roof with added parts, but do you sell these parts? Would it be safe to be installed in a manufactured home? We’re buying a brand new one but it’s a lower end model because as of right now it’s the best we can get for the price, but the walls are sectioned and the roof is pitched. Would this still be safe? We would be drywalling the whole house at a later time.

      Thanks!!

      • Danna

        Hi Keleigh,

        Congrats on your new home! How exciting! It is possible, especially in the newer models because they use better ceiling joists as opposed to older model modules. However, you do need to check with a qualified carpenter to tell for sure if it’s ok. All dance poles must be installed under or screwed into a ceiling joist, as long as you do that then all is well : ) There are many woman who have installed a pole in modular home successfully, but because every home is bult differently it’s important to get a local qualified carpenter to help you. Poles can be installed on slanted ceilings with an additional ceiling mount to accommodate the vaulted ceiling found here =>

    • Gabby

      Hello hope all is well! So I was planning on installing a pole in m basement that has tile floors but a big short fibers area rug, Do you recommend me taking out the area rug or it doesn’t really matter? I was also planning on getting a crash mat, but that will come a little later.

      • Danna

        It’s really the good quality rubber on the base of the pole that grips the floor and helps keep it in place. For that reason I wouldn’t recommend using the rug. All rugs are designed differently so it’s really hard to tell whether it would be an issue, but I feel better safe and sorry – best to pole safely : ) Hope that helps : )

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